Harry's Blog

  

Do you know someone who can't find a job?

Posted By: Harry Dahlstrom

Finding a good job is hard. Lots of people have been job hunting for months. They’ve filled out hundreds of job applications—but nothing happens—not even a phone call. What’s worse, they know employers are hiring. They hear that their friends are landing new jobs quickly—but they’re left out. What’s going on?

How do I explain my long-term unemployment?

Posted By: Harry Dahlstrom

“What did you do during your unemployment?” and “Why did you leave your last employer?” These are two big questions that both your friends and the hiring managers will ask you. To answer them, you need a simple, honest answer for each question. Here are some suggestions—

There are no jobs here anymore. What do I do now?

Posted By: Harry Dahlstrom

If the owners packed up the only plant in town and moved away, then your only choice might be to change your career. About 70 percent of those unemployed six months or longer do change careers. To support their families, the other 30 percent usually take jobs below their qualifications.

Plan B. Reach out to employers who are not hiring.

Posted By: Harry

Not getting a response from all the help-wanted ads and networking you’ve tried? Maybe you should try some old-school job hunting. See, employees change jobs all the time and managers are always on the lookout for new replacements. The key is to contact the manager before she advertises the job opening and attracts all of your competitors. Here’s the plan—

Starting salaries hit an all-time high for new college graduates.

Posted By: Harry Dahlstrom

In a study of 145,000 entry-level employment positions in the United States, researches found that the average starting salary for 2017 college graduates is $48,270. That’s three percent higher than last year and 14 percent higher than 2007, just before the Great Recession.

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